Posts Tagged ‘ICA’

Macroprosopus Dancehall Band at the ICA

November 6, 2008

There I was, transcribing an interview, when my hubby comes back all outta breath from Brick Lane Bike Polo.

I’m going to see Juliana do some art tonight, Mikey says she’s going to cover herself in microphones and roll around on the ground.”

I look up from the bed from which I have been slobbing out in all day, dressed in squat clothes I stole from our old house in Notting Hill.

Juliana is the brains behind Thing (see below), so there was no way I was gonna miss out on tonight’s event.

Julianas most amazing thing (2004)

Juliana's most amazing 'thing' (2004)

Well, get me on the guestlist,” I said. “I am coming to that.”

A few phone calls and a plate of reheated vegan chilli later, and we were riding across the river to my fave London venue, the ICA.

We got there just before eight only to find Juliana stressed out before the show. ‘I don’t know if we can get you in, but we’ll try,‘ she says, explaining that tonight she will not be covering herself in mics, but, in fact,using kitchen cutlery and a cheese grater to add to the ambiance. As you do.

She is part of the group of around 30 women who’s visceral noise was to close the ICA’s six-month long Nought To Sixty exhibition.

Plan B‘s Frances Morgan and Leopard Leg founder, (I think) Maya-Victoria Kjellstrand orchestrated the thing, which was meant to resemble the noise of animals swarming using the vocal power and techy noodling of a lot of impassioned women.

It really was a lot better than I’m describing.

Think Leopard Leg (if you saw them) meets the neo-tribal sounds of Gang Gang Dance without any of the pretensions. Oh and this. It was droning, grungey, hypnotic and visceral. Awesome. I wanna be in the band!

From what I heard, the 8pm performance was 10 mins shorter than the 10pm performance, but they both turned out pretty good. We didn’t have tix for the earlier show, even though we had arrived on time for it, so we sat around drinking free beer in the foyer until they let us in the darkened room.

Some pics:

The band

The band

Drumming

Drumming

Juliana Cerqueria Leite and other band members

Juliana Cerqueria Leite and other band members

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Wah Power Lunch at the ICA

October 15, 2008
The girls talk at the Wah Power Lunch, which timewise, was more like dinner time at the ICA

The girls talk at the Wah Power Lunch, which timewise, was more like dinner time at the ICA

On friday evening, girls who just wanted to have fun, network and get free goody bags clambered to the ICA for the Wah Power Lunch.

Sharmadean Reid - organiser of the Wah Power Lunch

Sharmadean Reid - organiser of the Wah Power Lunch


Organised by Sharmadean Reid, who works at bi-annual men’s mag, Arena Homme + as well as jet-setting round the world to style for sports brands, it brought together illustrator Kate Moross,, Topman senior leisurewear buyer, Hannah Burgess, Rinse FM Co-Founder, Sarah Lockhart and fashion designer, Katie Saunders under one roof.

The idea was to give the gaggle of wide-eyes girls insider tips on how to break into the fashion industry.

Katie Saunders snapped by Chris Crash

Katie Saunders snapped by Chris Crash

The youngest of the bunch, Sharmadean and Kate Moross gave the most passionate speeches; the first retelling the story of pestering The University of The Arts, London for a prospectus ever since she saw a flyer for it in her cousin’s bedroom when she was a kid, and knew she wanted to work in fashion thanks to the now-defunct BBC Clothes Show.

Kate Moross, part of Deano Jo’s Real Gold collective and self-titled “creative maestro” is just 22, but soon after finishing illustration at Wimbledon College of Art swung herself big-time commissions with ad agency Fallon, for Cadbury’s and more recently, Topshop. (See her stuff here)

It was a really fun, engaging evening. But among all the qustions fired from the girls in the crowd to those on stage, I felt like one was missing.

What’s with all the brand-love? The girls up front made it seem like working for brands like Nike and Puma were the pinaccle of success; yet I thought we they had been exposed for the global scallywags they are, with their nasty production habits (human rights et al) and hiked-up prices.

Why is our generation so happy to not only swallow the pill, but design for it too?

I’m not saying you have to ‘resist’ ad infinitum to be a decent human being; I just wondered where has all the questioning gone? With fab talent and a DIY attitude to success and self, and professional fulfillment, I’d like to see fresh, new innovators not give their skills to the major players, or at least – not so easily.

Face Addict and Edo Bertoglio

August 24, 2008
Coney Island 1980

Coney Island 1980

I met Edo Bertoglio at Soho House the other day, after a screening of his first new movie in years, Face Addict. Looking suave in a beige suit and trademark oversized black-rimmed glasses, Edo shows no trace of the former heroin addiction that forced him to leave Manhattan’s arty-fashionista community in 1990.

Though the film has its flaws (overlong, largely), it shows some great shots of the life that was.

Debbie Harry and Susan, 1977

Debbie Harry and Susan, 1977

Walter Steding

Walter Steding

Wendy Whitelaw

Wendy Whitelaw

Though Peter Bradshaw is older and wiser than me to enjoy the shots and memories of the kids who hung out in New York’s downtown in the late seventies to nineties, I largely concur with his review in The Guardian.

“Why should we care about any of these people? Well, it’s not immediately clear. What of their work survives now, which of the paintings or photos or underground movies come to life, right now, in 2008?

Bertoglio doesn’t offer any answers, and his musings about that forgotten “Downtown” scene are melancholy, but self-indulgent.”

Edo Bertoglio

Edo Bertoglio


Face Addict is part of the ICA in London’s Shoot Your Idols season